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HBR Magazine

July-August 2013

Connect, Then Lead

by Amy J.C. Cuddy, Matthew Kohut, and John Neffing

In puzzling over whether it’s better to be feared or loved as a leader, Machiavelli famously said that, because it’s nigh impossible to do both, leaders should opt for fear. Research from Harvard Business School’s Amy Cuddy and consultants Matthew Kohut and John Neffinger refutes that theory, arguing that leaders would do much better to begin with “love”—that is, to establish trust through warmth and understanding.

Most leaders today approach their jobs by emphasizing competence, strength, and credentials. But without first building a foundation of trust, they run the risk of eliciting fear, resentment, or envy.

Beginning with warmth allows trust to develop, facilitating both the exchange and the acceptance of ideas—people really hear your message and become open to it. Cultivating warmth and trust also boosts the quantity and quality of novel ideas that are produced.

The best way to gain influence is to combine warmth and strength—as difficult as Machiavelli says that may be to do. In this article, the authors look at research from behavioral economics, social psychology, and other disciplines and offer practical tactics for leaders hoping to project a healthy amount of both qualities.

 

Just what is an executive coach exactly?

Just what is an executive coach exactly?

Chris Woodman, managing director of Leadenhall Consulting recently (18/9/2012) published a blog in Managing people, Pay & benefits considering what  executive coaching exactly is. Do you know what and executive coach does for a living or are you considering executive coaching for yourself or someone else but you are not sure what it is all about and what to expect? It is common practice for professional sportspersons to have a coach, why then, do many business people not even know what an executive coach does, let alone consider having a...

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Out with the old, in with the old

Out with the old, in with the old

The beginning of this year 2012 Simon Holland wrote a blog in the HBR, January 05, 2012 titled In his first-ever blog to start the New Year, Simon Holland, Global Head of Strategic Change and Organizational Transformation argued that it’s time for a radical review of leadership development programs as most of these programs only maintain the status quo. He stated that long-term organizational change can only happen when true behavioural change takes place. And behavioural change in return can only take place if there is an in-depth...

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